Men & BRCA


ON THIS PAGE:

Can men carry a BRCA mutation?

What types of risks for developing cancer do men have with a BRCA mutation?

Could I have gotten a BRCA mutation from my father?

How do I (a man) know if I should get tested for BRCA?

I’m a man with a BRCA mutation, what can I do to reduce my risk of cancer?


Can men carry the BRCA mutation?

Yes. Both men and women can inherit and pass on a BRCA mutation. Men with a BRCA mutation have a lower chance overall of developing cancer than do women with a mutation, but their chances of breast cancer, prostate cancer, and a few other specific cancers are increased.

For more information on BRCA mutations in men, please visit:

Breast Cancer Risk Elevated in Male BRCA Mutation Carriers
by Science Daily News

Cancer risks among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers
by British Journal of Cancer

High Frequency of Germ-Line BRCA2 Mutations among Hungarian Male Breast Cancer Patients without Family History
by Department of Molecular Biology

BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Status and Tumor Characteristics in Male Breast Cancer
by American Association for Cancer Research

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What types of risks for developing cancer do men have with a BRCA mutation?

Men with a BRCA gene mutation have a higher risk of developing breast cancer, prostate cancer and skin cancer (melanoma). In some men (and women), BRCA2 gene mutations have been associated with an increased risk of lymphoma, melanoma, and cancers of the pancreas, gallbladder, bile duct, and stomach. Furthermore, these cancers are more likely to develop at a younger age in men with a BRCA mutation. Men with a BRCA mutation have a lower chance overall of developing cancer than do women with a mutation

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Could I have gotten a BRCA mutation from my father?

Yes. As both men and women carry BRCA mutations, it is possible to have inherited the mutated gene from your father.

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How do I (a man) know if I should get tested for BRCA?

Men from families with a history of breast and ovarian cancer should consider testing for a BRCA gene mutation particularly if any of the breast cancers occurred before age 50 (in either female or male relatives). Men with breast cancer themselves are highly likely to have a BRCA mutation and should consider testing. Men who have prostate cancer and a family history of breast cancer should also think about testing.

For more information on BRCA risks and prevention in Men, visit:

Breast Cancer Genes Can Affect Men, Too
by American Cancer Society

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I’m a man with a BRCA mutation, what can I do to reduce my risk of cancer?

Men who know they carry a BRCA gene mutation can take proactive steps such as getting screened regularly for some of the cancers associated with the mutation, such as annual prostate cancer screening with a PSA test and annual skin examinations for melanoma. Men with a BRCA mutation should also seek medical advice about any changes in their breasts. Even more so, it is important to share this result with your family when you deem appropriate as it may be life saving information to your sisters, mother and daughters.

For more information on BRCA risks and prevention in Men, visit:

Breast Cancer Genes Can Affect Men, Too
by American Cancer Society

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